The Maldon Embroidery

The first thing to notice about this is that is an embroidery not a tapestry, although the “Bayeux Tapestry” is also an embroidery ie hand-stitched. It was constructed to mark the millennium of the 991 Battle of Maldon, at which Vikings, possibly under Olaf Tryggvason, defeated and killed the Saxon Earldorman Brythnoth. It is displayed behind glass in the Maeldune Heritage Centre, the ground floor of the redundant St. Peter’s Church and below the Thomas Plume Library, on a corner of the High Street that leads downhill and to the east.

Apart from the battle itself, the embroidery shows: a stretcher taking Brythnoth to Ely Cathedral for burial, a Heinkel bomber that was shot down near the town (not in 991), Beeleigh Abbey and Henry II’s charter, the many local churches, the d’Arcy family and “their” Moot Hall, the Rose & Crown, Dr. Plume, shipping and other industry, the 45 stone Edward Bright, the evanescent rail links and the bypass that opened a year before the battle anniversary.

By super blue

Grandson of a Town player.

3 comments

  1. You can buy tapestry kits from John Lewis. They involve needles, not looms. While you never weave an embroidery, you can sew one type of tapestry. From a small sample, I reckon embroidery tends to involve irregular stitches, while tapestry uses a regular one, though not a cross-stitch.

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  2. So, I was unable to spot the stretcher carrying Brythnoth, Ely Cathedral or the downed Heinkel… perhaps the whole work is longer than the section shown? However, I was glad to see a boar up in the top margin – maybe Richard III visited during his Royal Progress?

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