The amazing bells of England….

 

St Mary in Castro, in grounds of Dover Castle

“….Then came the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1509 [???!] as a result of the feud between King Henry [VIII] and The Pope. In his rage he [Henry] vandalised all the external fabric and internal property but he stopped short of the bells as he was aware of their potency with the people. Instead they were saved and he distributed them amongst the churches….”

This extract is from this article Well, Henry VII died in 1509, and Henry VIII’s reign commenced, but the Dissolution of the Monasteries didn’t come until 1536-1541. Other than that, I haven’t studied the latter’s reign. Oh, apart from knowing the names and fates of his six unfortunate “wives”, of course. The man was hideous, but then, so was his miserable father.

Anyway, I must subdue my Yorkist fervour enough to say I didn’t know this little snippet about the bells being spared the fate of the rest of their buildings.

It’s true about the potency of bells, of course, and in the course of my research I’ve come upon a reference to England, especially London, being widely known for its bells. It can’t have felt right at all during World War II, when the church bells were silenced, to be rung only in the event of invasion. And who can forget the muted bells marking the funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales. (Who should have retained her HRH ! I’ll put that pettiness down to the wretched Tudor blood still flowing through certain royal veins!)

Enough, my prejudices are showing. So I simply recommend the above article, about England’s amazing bells.

2 comments

  1. Legally, why should lLady Diana have retained the title of HRH when she was no longer married to Charles?

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  2. I don’t know about the legality side, just that at the time it was widely regarded as “spiteful”. It seemed like that, and as (now) the Sussexes haven’t been completely denied their HRH, even though they’re no longer working royals, it seems a little like picking and choosing.

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