Completing the Set (2) – the female line cousins

In October, we published an updated version of a Bulletin article, showing that all of Henry VIII’s “wives” were descended from Edward I. Thanks to Ann for her comment on the above article, that Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour and Katherine Howard share the same mtDNA, therefore Edward VI and Elizabeth I should do. Having investigated… Continue reading Completing the Set (2) – the female line cousins

Was it a spring tide in 1607? Was it a storm? No, it was a tsunami! Or was it….?

  “….But the yeere 1606, the fourth of King James, the ryver of Severn rose upon a sodeyn Tuesday mornyng the 20 of January beyng the full pryme day and hyghest tyde after the change of the moone by reason of a myghty strong western wynde….” John Paul, Vicar of Almondsbury In ‘A True Report of… Continue reading Was it a spring tide in 1607? Was it a storm? No, it was a tsunami! Or was it….?

Henry V: one of the most influential kings of England….

“…Henry IV [Bolingbroke, as Duke of Lancaster] returned to England and became swept up in the Lancastrian campaign to unseat Richard…” Come on, Henry IV was the Lancastrian campaign! He certainly wasn’t an innocent bystander who was swept along in the stampede. You’ll never convince me he didn’t return to England intent upon getting rid… Continue reading Henry V: one of the most influential kings of England….

Katherine Plantagenet, her burial in St James Garlickhithe.

Reblogged from here The Great Fire of London. The devastating conflagration that consumed so much of medieval London including St James Garlickhythe.  Artist  Lieve Verschuier This post will of necessity prove to be short there being a dearth of information on both Katherine and the  pre-Fire St James Garlickhythe Church where she was buried.  The church… Continue reading Katherine Plantagenet, her burial in St James Garlickhithe.

Anne Herbert Countess of Pembroke, Yorkist widow & mother in law to Katherine Plantagenet

Reblogged from sparkypus.com A Medieval Potpourri Anne Devereux, John Lydgate’s Troy Book and Siege of Thebes @British Library Well that old wheel of fortune could certainly whizz around and no more so than in the lives of the noble women from the turbulent times we now know as the Wars of the Roses.  An example… Continue reading Anne Herbert Countess of Pembroke, Yorkist widow & mother in law to Katherine Plantagenet

SPLITTING HAIRS–AGAIN

A dramatic news story always makes headlines. Therefore, I was not entirely surprised when, several years ago, I saw a newpaper headline reading, ‘Richard III was a Blue-Eyed Blond.‘ Sadly, many people do not read beyond headlines, and completely missed the part that said ‘the blonde hair was probably only in childhood.’ (I never knew… Continue reading SPLITTING HAIRS–AGAIN

Did Anne Boleyn plot Henry VIII’s death….?

I have to confess that I’m not sure about the headline of  this article. Just what royal row can be spoken of in the present tense is a puzzle. What does it matter to our present royals if Anne Boleyn had Henry VIII‘s demise in mind. If she did, she failed. The horrible lump lived… Continue reading Did Anne Boleyn plot Henry VIII’s death….?

The Vinland Map, fact or fiction….?

“….The Vinland Map carries with it the air of mystery and, some would say, the stench of deception. In the vaults of Yale University, and insured for $25 Million, it is either a colossal fraud or an artefact of unparalleled value. The map appeared on the scene in 1957 when a couple of shady characters… Continue reading The Vinland Map, fact or fiction….?

Not every medieval nun wished to remain a nun….!

  We read of all the women who became nuns in the medieval period, and it is often imagined that they were willing—eager even—to live such a life forever more. Noble families, even the royal family, designated daughter to be nuns. Bridget, younger dughter of Edward IV, was destined for such a life from childhood,… Continue reading Not every medieval nun wished to remain a nun….!

The heraldic glass of East Anglia….

I always find heraldic glass both fascinating and beautiful, wherever it is. If you go here you’ll be able to access a paper about the heraldic glass of East Anglia, where Alston Court in Nayland has a wonderful display of Tudor glass. The shields displayed aren’t exclusively Tudor, of course, but apply to ancient families… Continue reading The heraldic glass of East Anglia….