Eleanor of Aquitaine, the Kingmaker and Richard II: the eyes have it….!

Well, I have to say that the above carving is very startling. It is believed to be of Eleanor of Aquitaine, and has just been discovered at Bradwell Abbey, Milton Keynes. There is nothing in this article to say why they are so certain it’s Eleanor, but they seem in no doubt. The first thing… Continue reading Eleanor of Aquitaine, the Kingmaker and Richard II: the eyes have it….!

Is it ‘Forty’? Or ‘Fourty’?

The following article is from the excellent Merriam Webster online dictionary, and although I tried to post just the link, I couldn’t get it to work. So I’m posting the article in full, and state here and now that none of it is my work. It’s all Merriam Webster, very interesting and deals with the… Continue reading Is it ‘Forty’? Or ‘Fourty’?

From Sir Simon Burley to Leadenhall, and a renowned gander named Old Tom….!

When looking for information about a residence associated with the ill-fated Sir Simon Burley (executed by the Lords Appellant in 1388) I had cause to investigate the properties around London’s Leadenhall Market. It seems Leadenhall stems from a mansion on the site, owned at the beginning of the 14th century by Sir Hugh Neville, which… Continue reading From Sir Simon Burley to Leadenhall, and a renowned gander named Old Tom….!

Clothes lines fluttering in 14th century Moorfields? I fear not….

  Writing historical fiction involves a lot of research…well, it does if the resultant book is to be taken seriously. So when it came to describing medieval Moorfields, just north of London’s city wall, I came upon the inevitable mention of drying grounds for washing. Yes, I knew all about them, because they turn up… Continue reading Clothes lines fluttering in 14th century Moorfields? I fear not….

Leprechauns were named by the Romans….?

There is a new dictionary of the medieval Irish language, contained in 23 volumes, see here. That’s a LOT of words! But one affects me more than all the others. It seems that “leprechaun” is not native Irish. It’s Roman. Oh, no. I wish they hadn’t discovered this, because as far as I’m concerned, leprechauns… Continue reading Leprechauns were named by the Romans….?

A tale of monarchs and national anthems

Anyone who has watched a Scottish rugby or association football match will be familiar with the Corries’ folk song O Flower of Scotland, which is played before their matches. The second line of the chorus (“Proud Edward’s army”) refers to Edward II, defeated at Bannockburn so that he never actually ruled Scotland although he may… Continue reading A tale of monarchs and national anthems

A book to avoid if you uphold the truth about Richard III….

When we buy a non-fiction book (in our case usually something to do with Richard III and the medieval period) we anticipate its arrival with some relish. This is how I felt when, after reading many praises for Peter Ackroyd’s History of England, I decided to buy Volume I online. It arrived this morning, and… Continue reading A book to avoid if you uphold the truth about Richard III….

EVERYTHING YOU WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT MEDIEVAL BEDS..

Opulent beds could be used to entertain friends and even shared with  guests staying overnight.  Well at least you would be warm.. A very interesting article here on medieval beds including a glossary …   I haven’t a clue as to what is going on with this lady and gentleman  but, as it shows a medieval… Continue reading EVERYTHING YOU WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT MEDIEVAL BEDS..

To put up a sign or not to put up a sign, that is the question….

  Here’s a tricky one. We need signs to direct us to places, in this case the Bowes Museum and “antiques quarter” in Barnard Castle. But putting up such a sign will interfere with a view of the famous Market Cross. So…should there be a sign or not? To read more, go to this Teesdale… Continue reading To put up a sign or not to put up a sign, that is the question….