The anonymous friar and the black arts….

I quote the footnote below because I believe it to be an example of giving someone the wrong name.

“….Another high-profile case comes in 1376, during the Good Parliament, with antagonism against Alice Perrers, Knights of the Parliament captured her physician, the Dominican friar Palange Wyk, accused of practising black arts on her behalf; Carole Rawcliffe, ‘The Profits of Practice: the Wealth and Status of Medical Men in Later Medieval England’, Social History of Medicine, I (1988): 73; and J.R. Maddicott, ‘Parliament and the Constituencies, 1272-1377’, in The English Parliament in the Middle Ages, ed. R.G. Davies and J.H. Denton (Manchester, 1981), pp 79-80….”

The above paragraph is from: Popular Protest in Late Medieval English Towns by Samuel K. Cohn, Jr, Douglas Aiton, Jr. and Samuel K. Cohn. Page 304, footnote 169.

Why do I think it names someone incorrectly? Because I have researched this particular case, and try as I will, I haven’t been able to find the actual name of the Dominican friar in question. For the purposes of this article, it doesn’t matter whether he did or didn’t cast spells and so on, just that he is never named. Except in this quoted footnote.

However, the Hammersmith manor where he was arrested, and which belonged to his mistress, Alice Perrers, was called Pallenswick (Pallingswyck, Palingswick, Paddingswick and so on) Now, it seems to me that Palange Wick and Pallenswick are confusingly similar. Too similar, in fact, to merely be coincidence. So I have to conclude that the friar remains unnamed, and his only connection with the words Palange and Wyk is that he was arrested in Pallenswick.

If anyone knows better, and can supply the friar’s name, I will be eternally grateful.

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