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Rewarded for betraying Buckingham to Richard…?

 

banisters

Banisters

While browsing around in pursuit of the legend of the pool that bubbled blood in Finchampstead, Berkshire, I came upon these snippets. Does anyone know more? 

“West Court is a fine 17th century building which, before improvements made in 1835, still had a moat and a drawbridge! It was taken on by Lady Marvyn’s relatives, the Perkins family of Ufton Court before they sold it to the Tattershalls, well known Catholic recusants, who were resident there when called to the Heralds’ Court in 1664 to prove their rights to the Tattershall coat of arms. These arms are still prominently displayed on the superb carved fireplace in the drawing room of the house. Cousins of the original Banister line lived at the sub-manor of ‘Banisters which they were supposedly given in reward for betraying the Duke of Buckingham to King Richard III in 1483 (this story appears to have been transferred from one of their Staffordshire homes).” 

 “The Banisters Estate in Finchampstead which remained in the possession of a family of that name for seven centuries until 1821 is, by tradition, reputed to have been a reward for the betrayal of Henry Stafford Duke of Buckingham during his rebellion against Richard III in 1483.”

As for the mysterious pool that bubbled blood:-

“The spring known as Dodwell’s (or Dozell’s) Well on Fleet Hill is named after St Oswald, King of Northumbria (r. AD 634-641). He travelled through this village on his way to meet King Cynegils of Wessex at Easthampstead, and, feeling thirsty, prayed for water. The Holy Well instantaneously sprang up. It is recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle of the year 1098 that:
In this year. . . during the summer, in Berkshire at Finchampstead, a pool of blood welled up, as many truthful men said who had seen it.
and in 1102:
“This year. . . at Finchampstead in Berkshire was seen blood from the earth. This was a very grievous year in this land, in manifold taxes, death of cattle, and perished crops, both corn and all fruir; also in the morning of St.Lawrence’s Day the wind did more harm than any man ever remembered before.
The well was famous in the early middle ages for flowing blood like this at times of national disaster. At other times it was said to have marvelous curative powers, especially for eye complaints. The well was accidentally destroyed in 1872 by deepening of the ditch, but there is still a constant trickle of water from the spot.”

 

 

 

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3 thoughts on “Rewarded for betraying Buckingham to Richard…?

  1. But is betraying a traitor really a betrayal? 🤔

    Liked by 2 people

    • viscountessw on said:

      Good point about traitors and betrayal. It makes me think. When a king still lives who has been deposed and his throne usurped, are those who still support that deposed king actually traitors? Or is it the usurper who is the traitor? I’m thinking of Richard II and Henry IV. To my mind, Henry IV was the traitor, because Richard II was the living true king. Henry finally disposed of Richard, but to my mind he remained a usurper. Remained the traitor. So betraying him was OK!!!! Yay!

      Of course, the same does not apply to Richard III, who was NOT a usurper, but had been invited to occupy a vacant throne. He was the true King of England, and Henry Tudor’s invading army murdered him (they didn’t just kill him in battle) at Bosworth. Tudor and his turncoat friends were the traitors that day.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. hoodedman1 on said:

    Ralph Bannister. One time servant to Buckingham. Bucks hid out with him–but Ralphie wasn’t too keen on his old boss and turned him in for the money.

    Liked by 2 people

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