Now it’s 3-0

A few months ago, we wrote to say that there were two JD Wetherspoons named after Richard III – the Lord High Constable in Gloucester and the Last Plantagenet in Leicester – but none after Henry VII. Now, having been reminded that Richard created the Court of Requests, there is one by that name in… Continue reading Now it’s 3-0

BLOOD OF ROSES (A Novella of Edward IV’s Victory at Towton)

Richard, Duke of York and his second son Edmund were killed at the battle of Wakefield at the bitter end of  1460. Within weeks, the Duke’s eldest son Edward was on the road with a mighty army, seeking revenge–and a crown. The novella BLOOD OF  ROSES by J.P. Reedman covers the period  from the Duke’s… Continue reading BLOOD OF ROSES (A Novella of Edward IV’s Victory at Towton)

Lucy Worsley’s Fireworks for a Tudor Queen ….

Lucy Worsley can always been relied upon t)o be entertaining, and her latest documentary – BBC – Lucy Worsley’s Fireworks for a Tudor Queen (2018 – is well up to standard. As the title suggests, she was going to reproduce the sort of amazing fireworks display that might have been created for Elizabeth I. In… Continue reading Lucy Worsley’s Fireworks for a Tudor Queen ….

Oops, the NY Times claimed Richard wasn’t found in Leicester, but in London….!

Even the New York Times gets it wrong! Apparently an earlier version of a book review had Richard being found in London, not Leicester. Someone advised them, and the error was corrected. Anyway, to read the whole review of A BRIEF HISTORY OF EVERYONE WHO EVER LIVED: The Human Story Retold Through Our Genes by… Continue reading Oops, the NY Times claimed Richard wasn’t found in Leicester, but in London….!

Archbishop of Canterbury found Richard’s funeral a slightly surreal experience….

“Ahead of his three-day visit to Leicester, the Archbishop of Canterbury talks about the burial of King Richard III, his last major visit in the city, in 2015. “The remains of King Richard III was reburied after his remains were found below a car park in 2012. “The right-reverend Justin Welby led the service and… Continue reading Archbishop of Canterbury found Richard’s funeral a slightly surreal experience….

The Swynford/ Beaufort case again

As we said five years ago, it is unclear whether John, Marquess of Somerset and Dorset, really was the son of John of Gaunt or of Sir Hugh Swynford. Furthermore, the common law answer to that question may be different to the genetic answer, as we revealed that Swynford could well have died after the… Continue reading The Swynford/ Beaufort case again

The Bones in the Urn again!…a 17th Century Hoax?

UPDATED POST @ sparkypus.com A Medieval Potpourri https://sparkypus.com/2020/05/14/the-bones-in-the-urn-again-a-17th-century-hoax/ 19th century painting of the Henry VII Chapel by an unknown artist.  The entrance to the area where the urn stands is to the left of the tomb of Henry VII Helen Maurer, in her wonderful article, Whodunnit: The Suspects in the Case  mentioned in the notes  ‘As for why… Continue reading The Bones in the Urn again!…a 17th Century Hoax?

The abduction of Jane Sacherverell in November 1485….

Stealing women (and also male wards) was a shamefully common event, especially in the 14th century, as I wrote yesterday. But it was still going on in the 15th century. Richard legislated on behalf of women, but so did Henry VII, with a 1487 “Acte against taking awaye of Women against theire Willes”. The following… Continue reading The abduction of Jane Sacherverell in November 1485….