Did Richard III choose his nephew Lincoln as his heir presumptive….?

The identity of Richard’s chosen heir has always been a sort-of mystery. Not to me. I have always believed he chose his sister’s eldest son, John de la Pole, Earl of Lincoln. But then I’m stubborn, and once I have made up my mind, it takes a lot to shift me. Lincoln seemed the obvious… Continue reading Did Richard III choose his nephew Lincoln as his heir presumptive….?

Witchcraft (4): Witchcraft American Style

Why do the Salem Witch Trials continue to fascinate after three hundred and twenty five years?  Why do tourists and locals, wiccans, witches, warlocks and wizards continue to walk the crowded streets of this pretty little seaside city in Massachusetts in search of magic and mayhem?  What propels them to stroll the narrow streets, licking… Continue reading Witchcraft (4): Witchcraft American Style

Witchcraft (3): Matthew Hopkins

If the witchcraft trials at North Berwick in the 1590s and later in England, of which Pendle in 1610 is an example, happened because James VI/I fervently believed in witchcraft, as shown by the three characters in Macbeth, it can be argued that the subsequent decline in such cases came because judges and Charles I… Continue reading Witchcraft (3): Matthew Hopkins

Witchcraft (2): The Pendle Trials

Lancashire, in the early 17th Century, was one of the poorest and least populated counties of England, where even many gentry families had an income of less than £100 a year. The Forest of Pendle, which lies between Burnley, Colne, Clitheroe and Whalley in a remote corner of the county close to the Yorkshire border,… Continue reading Witchcraft (2): The Pendle Trials

Witchcraft (1): Witchcraft and Royalty: The Cases against Eleanor Cobham and Joanne of Navarre

Originally posted on Giaconda's Blog:
Fake news – smearing the opposition With the current interest in the media about the spread of ‘fake news’ and misinformation, it seems appropriate to reconsider the cases of two royal ladies who were both accused and found guilty of witchcraft during the early C15th. Were these simply cases…

SIR MATTHEW CRADDOCK 1468 – 1531

 Matthew Craddock was the son of Richard ap Gwilliam ap Evan ap Craddock Vreichfras and Jennet Horton of Candleston Castle in Glamorgan. His great grandfather, William Horton of Tregwynt in Pembrokeshire, married Joan de Canteloupe the heiress of Candleston. Jennet Horton was their granddaughter. I first came across Matthew Craddock while looking at anything that… Continue reading SIR MATTHEW CRADDOCK 1468 – 1531

How did Henry VII find the tomb of King Arthur…?

   The following article is based on books by Chris Barber and David Pykitt, so I do not claim anything as my own work. The books are The Legacy of King Arthur and Journey to Avalon. It is also based on a third book by Chris Barber called King Arthur: The Mystery Unravelled, which contains more… Continue reading How did Henry VII find the tomb of King Arthur…?

Fancy acquiring Sheriff Hutton castle….?

Right, ladies and gentlemen. £1.1 million is what we need. If we get out our numerous piggy banks and pool our resources, we may acquire one of Richard’s most important castles in the north! “THE ruins of Sheriff Hutton castle near York are for sale as part of a £1.1 million estate. “The remains of… Continue reading Fancy acquiring Sheriff Hutton castle….?

Did the boys from the Tower escape from one of Yorkshire’s lost coastal towns or villages…?

I have often wondered about Richard’s plans for the Yorkist “heirs” he sent for safety to Sheriff Hutton. We know Elizabeth of York was there, because Henry Tudor sent a very swift party to secure her person. She was then escorted regally to London, to be greeted at Lambeth by her husband-to-be. After he’d established… Continue reading Did the boys from the Tower escape from one of Yorkshire’s lost coastal towns or villages…?

Hey diddle diddle, it’s Richard III….!

Sometime ago I read that the words of the old Hey Diddle Diddle nursery rhyme were in fact a reference to the story of Richard III. There are other theories, of course, including this of Elizabeth I: “The story goes that Elizabeth, was often called a cat for the treatment of her court, the mice.… Continue reading Hey diddle diddle, it’s Richard III….!