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A juicy Richard….?

Benedict & Co

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvandradio/12077552/best-tv-shows-2016.html

Is Benedict Cumberbatch your notion of Shakespeare’s Richard? He isn’t mine, so this viewing prospect isn’t at all juicy. I imagine I’m in the minority!

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5 thoughts on “A juicy Richard….?

  1. Jasmine on said:

    What exactly does ‘juicy’ mean in this context? Is this about physical appearance?

    Shakespeare’s play is fictional drama loosely based on one or two traditionalist approaches to the history of the period. Surely it is the competence of the actor in the key role which is important, not what he looks like.

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  2. viscountessw on said:

    Nothing to do with the actor’s appearance, just his performance. The article uses the word juicy – I took it to mean an interpretation to really ‘get one’s breathless attention’. To me, Benedict Cumberbatch will not achieve this. It’s a matter of personal opinion.

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    • Jasmine on said:

      Thanks for the clarification. Until we see him, it will be difficult to judge how he will be in the role.

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      • Verses cleverly “hammy” Larry Olivier when being very natteringly white bore or even “meaty” Richard Mansfield who actually became RIII for his contemporary Victorians or mayhap even David Garrick whose soul imbibed much from Will Shakespeare’s well of tyme even if he looked like a distant someone in a Gainsborough landscape???

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  3. Isn’t he a (very) distant cousin of Richard’s? Not that this will matter for a performance as the broadly-drawn Shakespearian cartoon, mind you.

    Ever notice how very much different the play allegedly based on the life and times of Richard is from every other Shakespearean history play? Particularly in a so-called history play that’s also a tragedy? Unlike the other history plays, which tend to stick fairly close to the facts as they were known at the time (even for people over a millenium and a half distant like Marc Antony and Cleopatra), Shakespeare’s play on Richard avoids the known history in favor of sticking closely to the More-Moreton story (which More never published during his lifetime) and makes error after error after error, to the point of reading more like farce than either history or tragedy.

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