Richard II’s visit to Edward II’s tomb, 1390.

Edward II‘s “tomb” is, as is well-known, to be found in Gloucester Cathedral. What is less well-known is that Richard II wanted it become a shrine, and for his great-grandfather to become St. Edward of Caernarfon. Interestingly, we cannot even be entirely sure that Edward II’s remains lie in the tomb. Kathryn Warner has produced… Continue reading Richard II’s visit to Edward II’s tomb, 1390.

Elizabeth Woodville was queen in her own right….?

According to this article (titled Vic Keegan’s Lost London 111: Elizabeth Woodville’s Westminster Abbey sanctuary) Elizabeth Woodville was “queen in her own right”. I think not. She was queen because she married King Edward IV. She was his consort. Well, perhaps that too should be qualified, because Edward appears to have been careless enough to… Continue reading Elizabeth Woodville was queen in her own right….?

The Betrayal of Richard III by V B Lamb – a book review

Reblogged from A Medieval Potpourri sparkypus.com Artist Emma Vieceli This book is a little gem.  Written by the late Vivien Beatrix Lamb and first published in 1959 it’s no surprise that it’s still in print and a new edition available from The Richard III Society online shop with an introduction and notes by  Peter Hammond.   … Continue reading The Betrayal of Richard III by V B Lamb – a book review

1066 Remembered

Nearly 1,000 years have passed… In October 2016 I began a series of posts in memory of 1066, arguably the most important year in the history of England. Interestingly enough, while I enjoyed history, this era was not always my favored, as it once seemed so complicated and intimidating; my memories of studying it in school were… Continue reading 1066 Remembered

A medieval mystery in Stamford….

I love it when local historians delve into their area’s past and start unearthing curious things. This is what retired academic Linda Ball has done for the part of Stamford in which she grew up. St Paul’s Street, Stamford, was on the site of what was once either Greyfriars or Whitefriars. The medieval mystery of… Continue reading A medieval mystery in Stamford….

Lady Katherine Gordon – Wife to Perkin Warbeck

Reblogged from A medieval Potpourri sparkypus.com    St Michaels Mount.  ‘A Strong Place and Mighty’  wrote Warkworth in his Chronicle. Perkin left Katherine and their son here prior to his march to Exeter.  Note the causeway.  Thanks to John Starkey @ Flikr for this atmospheric photo. It may seem prima facie that Katherine was a tragic… Continue reading Lady Katherine Gordon – Wife to Perkin Warbeck

The Decline of Villeinage

The Peasants’ Revolt of 1381 is well-known, and it is often thought that the decline of serfdom, or villeinage, began at about this time. The truth is more complex. Like most English traditions, villeinage took a long time to pass and outlived its usefulness by many decades. Indeed Queen Elizabeth I still owned serfs –… Continue reading The Decline of Villeinage

The portrait at Hever Castle is more like Henry VI than Richard III….

I’ve seen this (awful!) portrait of Richard before. It just doesn’t look like him, more one of the invented Tudor versions of him, i.e. monstrous and evil, or weak and terrified of all things Tudor. This one fits the ‘weak and terrified’ mould, and if it were listed as a portrait of Henry VI, I’d… Continue reading The portrait at Hever Castle is more like Henry VI than Richard III….

MISIDENTIFIED HISTORICAL PORTRAITS INCLUDING TUDOR QUEENS…

Reblogged from MISIDENTIFIED HISTORICAL PORTRAITS INCLUDING TUDOR QUEENS… Does anyone else like me get irritated by misidentified portraits of historical characters?  Is it that difficult to get correct? It’s quite sloppy to be honest as just a quick glance at them tells you something ain’t quite right here!  It’s particularly common around  16th century portraiture when… Continue reading MISIDENTIFIED HISTORICAL PORTRAITS INCLUDING TUDOR QUEENS…

A 15th-century tapestry with a mysterious history….

  The magnificent tapestry in the above illustration is the one indicated in my heading. It’s the oldest possessed by the National Trust, and after four years of careful cleaning and attention, it’s going on display at Montacute House in Somerset. It was commissioned by a French knight and created by a weaver in Tournai.… Continue reading A 15th-century tapestry with a mysterious history….