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The first “red carpet” in England….?

 

We’re all accustomed to seeing dignitaries, film stars and so on walking along a red carpet, and know it’s a sign of great respect, courtesy or just plain flattery. According to Wikipedia :-

“The earliest known reference to walking a red carpet in literature is in the play Agamemnon by Aeschylus, written in 458 BC. When the title character returns from Troy, he is greeted by his vengeful wife Clytemnestra who offers him a red path to walk upon:-

“ ‘Now my beloved, step down from your chariot, and let not your foot, my lord, touch the Earth. Servants, let there be spread before the house he never expected to see, where Justice leads him in, a crimson path.’

“Agamemnon, knowing that only gods walk on such luxury, responds with trepidation:

“ ‘I am a mortal, a man; I cannot trample upon these tinted splendours without fear thrown in my path.’ “

From the above, I imagine that Aeschylus wasn’t the first one to know about red carpets, just the first to mention such a thing. So how much earlier did they in fact come about? I don’t know, but I was curious enough to wonder when the first reference appeared in England.

I’m afraid I could go no further back than 16th July, 1377, and the coronation of Richard II. According to King Richard II by Bryan Bevan (and various other sources): “Scarlet cloth had been laid down by William de Latymer, the king’s almoner, from the hall of the Palace of Westminster to the Abbey. So the boy, Richard, wearing white robes and a pair of red velvet shoes with fleurs-de-lis worked on them in pearls, passed in procession to the Abbey.”

Finding an illustration of this first coronation procession to the Abbey has defied me. There appear to only be images of the boy king on the throne during the ceremony, and one afterwards, when the exhausted boy was carried shoulder-high from the Abbey. No glimpse of the “red cloth”.

As for finding any medieval illustration of a red carpet of any description, all I could locate was another from the reign of Richard II – concerning the death, on 7th June 1394, of his much loved wife, Anne of Bohemia. This shows only that the artist decided to furnish her bedchamber with a patterned red carpet. Whether or not this signifies her “film star” status, I don’t know.

So, was Richard’s coronation the first time in England? I doubt it, but must appeal to you for any earlier references.

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Doggeing “Tudor” footsteps?

Michele Schindler’s seminal biography of Francis Viscount Lovell, one of the trio named in Colyngbourne‘s doggerel, is published today. Hopefully, it will go towards solving the great mystery of his fate.

Could he really have suffocated in a Minster Lovell chamber, after the estate was given to Jasper “Tudor”? Could he have ended his days in Scotland, under a safe conduct complicated by the Sauchieburn rebellion, or was that a red herring?

Ten medieval scandals….!


Pope Stephen VI had the body of his predecessor, Pope Formosus, exhumed and put on trial.
 

“….What are the scandals that made headlines in the Middle Ages? Kings and Popes would be involved in some of the craziest stories of sex and corruption that would make today’s news seem quite tame. From a cross-dressing prostitute to the trial of a dead Pope, here are ten almost-unbelievable medieval scandals….”

Well, you’ll find these “gems” at this site I imagine they’re all true, although some of them beggar belief. Especially the rather gruesome episode illustrated above.

Wenceslaus Hollar, by Gillian Tindall…

 

Until now, I have not encountered any of the books of Gilliam Tindall, but some of them look as if they may be of interest to us. The one I came upon is here, which I intend to get, because I have always loved the beautifully detailed work of Wenceslaus Hollar, about whom I am eager to learn more.

But Gillian Tindall has written other books which may be worth a look …

A drive to save Barnard Castle church windows paid for by Richard III….

Local people in Barnard Castle are getting together to help with restoration at St Mary’s parish church. Such a thing would always be of interest to us, of course, more especially if you read the article below and get to: “Work is also needed to replace stonework around some of the windows that Richard III paid to have installed and which were last replaced during Victorian times.”

Sweating Sickness in 1485 – a missed publicity opportunity….?

sweating sickness

We all know that the Sweating Sickness arrived in Britain with Henry Tudor’s invading army in 1485. Thank you very much, Harri! Well, I have to wonder why there wasn’t a widespread belief that the Sweating Sickness was God’s condemnation of the vile usurper! That was one propaganda move Henry Tudor was very careful to avoid.

Unfortunately, the Yorkists missed an opportunity. If Tudor had lost and scuttled back to wherever in France or Brittany, his busy publicity guys would have been very quick indeed to point a superstitious and effective finger at Richard, for being the object of God’s towering displeasure!

The bones of 2,500 people under a Northamptonshire church….

“….The Holy Trinity Church in the small town of Rothwell [Northamptonshire] houses the corpses of 2,500 ancient men, women and children in a mysterious “hall of bones….”

I, um, hate the thought of being in a church with all those bones under it, but it is a mystery, all the same. Nothing would persuade me to go down to look, but if others go down and are able to work out the who, what, where, when and why, then I wish them well. These things do need to be explained, so it certainly doesn’t do for everyone to be as lily-livered as me.

Of course, those who do know everything, are the bones themselves…and they’re just not saying.

from Tokkaro.com

Now, on another tack entirely, go to the bottom of this article. This is where I start splitting hairs. Some dumbcluck at The Sun seems to think there were car parks in 1485! What else can I believe when he puts Richard’s burial site at Number 1 in a list of weird burial sites? Richard, he says, was found under a car park! Well, yes he was, but he wasn’t buried under one—the car park was built over his burial. Which is rather different.

Richard was interred at Greyfriars when it was still very much a place of worship, but it disappeared in the 16th century, thanks to Henry VIII. Richard’s resting place remained however, and was lost. Then the car park was built. The car park certainly wasn’t there in 1485, waiting for Richard to be placed beneath it! Nit-picking? Moi? Perish the thought.

If Thomas More isn’t too much for Ricardian stomachs….

More isn’t our favourite man by any stretch of the imagination, but he is important because of the immensely detrimental effect he has had upon the history and reputation of Richard III. He, the Tudors and Shakespeare conspired to ruin Richard’s honour, and we Ricardians will never forgive them. But, if you can bring yourself to go to to this source you will find some interesting documents that can be examined. Including The History of King Richard III in English and Latin.

Henry VI’s Bed-Chamber Tutor?

There’s a new book on Henry VI and Margaret of Anjou coming out, in which historian Lauren Johnson surmises that the over-pious Henry VI may have had a few problems in the bedroom department and hence had  attendants who would ‘guide’ him in the ways of  love. Henry was a notably prudish man who once erupted in shocked fury when some female dancers arrived at court wearing gowns that ‘exposed their bosom.’ He also suffered some kind of serious mental health issues, even becoming catatonic for an extended period, an illness inherited through his mother, Catherine of Valois, whose father Charles had also suffered severe mental illness (he thought he was made of glass), as did several other members of the extended family.

It was about 8 years before Henry  and Margaret produced a child, Edward of Westminster, and the baby was born during one of the King’s bouts of illness; the monarch did not respond or acknowledge his child, even when the Duke of Buckingham placed the baby in his arms. Later, he did come round but promptly exclaimed that the baby must have ‘been brought by the Holy Ghost’.

As one might expect, rumours went around that the child was not his, but was the son of Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset.

In his play Henry VI, Shakespeare had Margaret have a passionate fling with William de la Pole, the Duke of Suffolk but that does not seem to have been a contemporary rumour–however, it is interesting to note that one of the figures who was supposed to be helping Henry out in the ‘bedroom department’ was none other than the…Duke of Suffolk. Maybe the Duke decided to be a little TOO helpful on occasion… The other ‘attendant’ of note happens to be Ralph Botiller–that would be Eleanor Talbot‘s father-in-law, Lord Sudeley–although no one has ever accused him of having an affair with Margaret of Anjou. Her image, however, is on the exterior of the chapel he built at Sudeley, along with that of Henry.

 

HENRYVI

Article on Henry VI Sex Coach!

Um…a direct descendant of Richard III…?

I didn’t think anyone could claim “direct” descent from Richard III – because Richard is not known to have had any grandchildren. Children, yes, but whether or not they had children of their own is not known. This is the most authoritative source at present.

So how this claim can be made for Danny Dyer, I really don’t know. Perhaps Hello Magazine has the answer? 

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