Book Review: How to Survive in Medieval England by Toni Mount

This useful guide is a vital accessory when you next visit the Middle Ages. How will you manage without your mobile phone, internet or social media? When transport means walking or, for the better off, horse-back, how will you know where you are or where to go? Where will you live and what should you… Continue reading Book Review: How to Survive in Medieval England by Toni Mount

A tiny gold Bible on a par with the Middleham Jewel….?

  An NHS nurse—Buffy Bailey—has struck gold, quite literally, being a detectorist who has located a jewel that is taking the archaeological world by storm. When she eventually reaps the benefit, her income will knock NHS wages into a cocked hat! She found a tiny gold Bible pendant (only 1.5 cm long!) that seems to… Continue reading A tiny gold Bible on a par with the Middleham Jewel….?

The joys of catacombs, caves and labyrinths….

When we wonder about our DNA, origins and so on, there’s one that I’m pretty sure will never turn up in my distant history: I am not descended from troglodytes. I hate going underground—the Circle Line in London made my hair stand on end. My entire experience of caves consists of Cheddar, Wookey Hole and… Continue reading The joys of catacombs, caves and labyrinths….

Baby William, Baby William and, er, Baby William….

  What’s a long-suffering author to do when her book presents her with three babies from three families, actual people, all called William? Oh joy…. How I wish medieval folk had been more free-spirited and went for unusual names. But no, they called their boys William, Edward, John, Thomas or Henry. It’s very tiresome indeed,… Continue reading Baby William, Baby William and, er, Baby William….

London Bridge and Its Houses c.1209-1761 by Dorian Gerhold – a review.

Reblogged from A Medieval Potpourri @ sparkypus.com A view of the bridge  from Southwark, c.1630.  Note the houses that are standing to the south of the Stone Gate, shown here adorned with heads on pikes, were in fact on the first pier of the bridge.  This is one of the few remaining pictures showing the city… Continue reading London Bridge and Its Houses c.1209-1761 by Dorian Gerhold – a review.

Which Master Crafter will win this new series….?

  According to The Prince’s Master Crafters: The Next Generation (Sky Arts), a new young generation of crafters is desperately needed to halt a virtual haemorrhage of endangered skills, and who better to drum up support than His Royal Highness, Prince of Wales, who is always at the forefront of matters concerning our heritage. The… Continue reading Which Master Crafter will win this new series….?

A HAWKING RING OF THE TALBOT FAMILY

Recently the rains washed off some soil in a muddy Shropshire field, and yet another metal detectorist had a lucky find–a hawking ring from the Elizabethan period. The most intriguing thing to me was the very bold lettering spelling the name JOHN TALBOT AT GRAFTON across the band of the tiny ring. As it was… Continue reading A HAWKING RING OF THE TALBOT FAMILY

Find the Roman roads of Britain….

Finding the Roman roads of England and Wales can be tricky, but now there’s a “London Underground” map that identifies them all. Well, not quite, but mostly. On discovering this site I went immediately to find Stone Street in Kent…but it’s marked as unnamed. Stone Street is definitely a Roman road. It’s still there and… Continue reading Find the Roman roads of Britain….

St. Philip Howard and the greyhound in the Tower

Philip Howard, lived from 1557-1595. He was the only son of Thomas Howard 4th Duke of Norfolk by his first wife, Lady Mary Fitzalan who was, of course, the Arundel heiress. Philip’s father was executed for treason against Queen Elizabeth I in 1572, which explains why Philip was not allowed to succeed as Duke of… Continue reading St. Philip Howard and the greyhound in the Tower

A convict’s skull found by the Thames after 200 years….

This article may not be our period exactly, but it’s another example of the things that continually turn up on the Thames foreshore. Mind you, I fail to see how it can be stated with any conviction (sorry!) that the skull is that of a convict “thrown off [a] prison ship” 200 years ago in… Continue reading A convict’s skull found by the Thames after 200 years….